Guide: Socionics Personality Model

Socionics

What is the Socionics Personality Model?

As the love child between sociology and personality psychology, Socionics offers a more rigorous and interpersonal view of personality typology theory. By framing the eight Jungian functions in eight positions (i.e. Model A), the resulting 16 Sociotypes are uniquely related to each other.

Coined by Ausra Augustina in the 1970s, she came from an academic background under the family science department from Vilnius Pedagogical University. During her studies, she created Socionics from the ground-up from on-site observation during her practicum period.

She created the intertype relations chart of the 16 Sociotypes, which has nicknames as follows:

  1. Identity
  2. Quasi-Identity
  3. Congenerity
  4. Requester Recipient
  5. Cooperation
  6. Requester
  7. Super-Ego
  8. Activation
  9. Extinguishment
  10. Mirror
  11. Mirage
  12. Supervisor
  13. Semi-Duality
  14. Supervisee
  15. Duality
  16. Conflict

The Socionics model depicts a framework for compatibility and sees potential to improve team-building in management and business, which translates to increased growth across various departments. The humanitarian sciences are also well-equipped for Socionics—philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, literature, and so forth.

Translation from Jungian Notation

Sources reference the J/P switch to p/j from the typing by Briggs and Myers to Socionics. However, the two systems operate on different groupings of cognitive functions and focuses (i.e. behavior versus interpersonal relations).

Alphas: ILE (ENTp), SEI (ISFp), ESE (ESFj), LII (INTj)

Betas: EIE (ENFj), LSI (ISTj), SLE (ESTp), IEI (INFp)

Gammas: SEE (ESFp), ILI (INTp), LIE (ENTj), ESI (ISFj)

Deltas: LSE (ESTj), EII (INFj), IEE (ENFp), SLI (ISTp)

Quadras

Socionics quadras arrange the Sociotypes into four groups of four—sharing workflow preferences and general worldviews. Primary friendships also tend to fall under a particular quadra.

Alpha (Ti, Ne, Fe, Si)

ILE, SEI, ESE, LII
Beta (Ti, Se, Fe, Ni)

EIE, LSI, SLE, IEI
Gamma (Fi, Se, Te, Ni)

SEE, ILI, LIE, ESI
Delta (Fi, Ne, Te, Si)

LSE, EII, IEE, SLI

Clubs

Socionics clubs sort the 16 Sociotypes into four groups, which tend to share hobbies, interests, as well as creative pursuits. Sociotypes in the same club also have similar thought processes and intellectual or academic values.

Researchers (NT)

ILE, LIE, ILI, LII
Socials (SF)

SEE, ESE, SEI, ESI
Pragmatists (ST)

SLE, LSE, SLI, LSI
Humanitarians (NF)

IEE, EIE, IEI, EII

Temperaments

Extraversion–Introversion and Irrational–Rational dichotomies. Similar to the four temperaments model proposed by Hippocrates (i.e. EP – Sanguine, EJ – Choleric, IP – Phlegmatic, IJ – Melancholic).

EP (Flexible–Maneuvering)

ILE, SLE, SEE, IEE
EJ (Linear–Assertive)

ESE, EIE, LIE, LSE
IP (Receptive–Adaptive)

IEI, SEI, ILI, SLI
IJ (Balanced–Stable)

LII, LSI, ESI, EII

Socionics Dichotomies

There are 15 total scales in the Socionics dichotomies, four (4) of them being unique to Socionics:

  • Introverted–Extraverted
  • Rational–Irrational
  • Intuitive–Sensing
  • Logical–Ethical

Below are the remaining 11 dichotomies (also commonly known as the Reinin dichotomies):

  • Static–Dynamic
  • Positivist–Negativist
  • Asking–Declaring
  • Tactical–Strategic
  • Constructivist–Emotivist
  • Result–Process
  • Yielding–Obstinate
  • Carefree–Farsighted
  • Judicious–Decisive
  • Aristocracy–Democracy
  • Merry–Serious

The goal of the dichotomies is to effectively map out a series of scales to accurately determine various Sociotypes. Currently, more research is needed within the Socionics framework to paint a clearer picture of various behaviors manifested in each Sociotype.

Model A

Augustina proposed the eight Jungian functions in eight respective positions, as part of the following blocks:

Ego (1, 2)

  • Most confident
  • Prone to overuse
  • Autopilot in day-to-day life
  • Derives purpose
  • Indifferent to praise

Superego (3, 4)

  • Lacks confidence
  • Sensitive to criticism
  • Prone to overreaction
  • Source of stress & anxiety
  • Appreciates praise

Superid (5, 6)

  • Poorly developed
  • Seen as chores best left to others
  • Source of recreation
  • Appreciates help

Id (7, 8)

  • Most well-developed
  • Seen as boring & meaningless
  • Prone to being ignored
  • Source of skill growth
  • Indifferent to help
1 – Leading

Ego

(Strong)
(Accepting)
2 – Creative

Ego

(Strong)
(Producing)
3 – Role

Superego

(Weak)
(Accepting)
4 – Vulnerable

Superego

(Weak)
(Producing)
5 – Suggestive

Superid

(Weak)
(Accepting)
6 – Mobilizing

Superid

(Weak)
(Producing)
7 – Ignoring

Id

(Strong)
(Accepting)
8 – Demonstrative

Id

(Strong)
(Producing)

Model A categorizes functions to serve distinct roles and work together to facilitate emergent patterns in thought and action, both internally and externally—like a house with rooms for specific purposes, and differing levels of importance and frequency of visits.

Information Metabolism (IM)

Information Metabolism emphasizes concepts of flow, transfer, movement, and spectrum of the psyche—which is split up into four components:

Comparable to the biological processes of metabolization, Information Metabolism highlights the energies present within each Sociotype that interact with the environment to produce resulting behaviors.

  1. Ego
  2. Superego
  3. Superid
  4. Id

The main three-component model of the psyche is well-known: Id, Ego, and Superego. What then, is the Superid? It can be thought of as the mediator between the Id and the Superego, which has the tendency to emerge during existential crises or bouts of hopelessness.

PoLR Descriptions

As a measure of each Sociotype’s most vulnerable function, PoLR takes a stab at each Sociotype’s weakness to light, in relation to their weaker functions (e.g. Role, Vulnerable, Suggestive, Mobilizing).

PoLR stands for the Vulnerable function in Socionics, which is the area that often unconsciously gets each Sociotype into trouble—with the core reason being staggeringly difficult to figure out.

As a general rule of thumb, the PoLR function is hidden in plain sight and goes unacknowledged until it is forcefully pushed to perform under massive amounts of stress. And then it makes its presence known (ready or not), on full blast.

Bitwise Operations

Walking into mathematics and computer science, Socionics can be moulded from the default Gulenko-Jungian (G-J) notation to bitwise base-2, and even hexadecimal formats. In a digital era with user-experience personas and large-scale data operations, Socionics may potentially have an upper hand.

The Socionics bitwise operations chart:

G-J TypeBase-2Base-10Base-16Relation
ENTp000000Identity
ENTj000111Quasi-Identity
ENFp001022Congenerity
ENFj001133Requester Recipient
ESTp010044Cooperation
ESTj010155Requester
ESFp011066Super-Ego
ESFj011177Activation
INTp100088Extinguishment
INTj100199Mirror
INFp101010AMirage
INFj101111BSupervisor
ISTp110012CSemi-Duality
ISTj110113DSupervisee
ISFp111014EDuality
ISFj111115FConflict

Summary: Socionics

  • Translation from Jungian Notation
  • Quadras
  • Clubs
  • Temperaments
  • Dichotomies
  • Model A
  • Information Metabolism
  • PoLR (Vulnerable Function)
  • Bitwise Operations

References

Bukalov, Aleksandr. (2000). Socionics: humanitarian, social, political and information intellectual technologies of the XXI century. Socionics, mentology and personality psychology.

Bukalov, Aleksandr & Karpenko, Olga. (2013). Socionics and Management. Management and personnel: psychology of management, socionics and sociology. 2013. 5-9.

Karpenko, Olga & Bukalov, Aleksandr. (2013). Socionics as an academic scientific discipline. Socionics, mentology and personality psychology.

Pietrak, Karol. (2017). The Foundations of Socionics – A Review. Cognitive Systems Research. 47. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogsys.2017.07.001.